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I don´t understand the Anxious Thoghts Form or the Panic Attack Form


StevenS
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6 years ago 0 StevenS 29 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Hi Samantha,

I did go to Session 2 hoping that it would help me to understand.  At first it did not.  Only after talking to a couple of people and reading the "pre-filled-out" forms did it start to make some sense.  I understood the forms, I could fill them out in my sleep.  My point was never that I didn't understand what the forms wanted.  It was that nothing told me in a way that made sense to me...that I could justify filling them out...wasting paper, ink and time on something that i most likely would never go back to.  Either allot of people have this issue or I am just rare, but only by going to the Advanced Anxiety Thoughts Form and then reading the example which I skipped since the "real form" was unlocked did I start to get it...at least to a point.  I still don't see me referring back to these forms.  I am not that organized and also don't see  a benefit in comparing the present to the past.  I would think that would be self evident. As with all things...time will tell.  I do think that there should be a better way to make people see actual value in these forms since they seem to be a core aspect to this program.  The way it is currently written does not clearly state any true value except to those that have no background in therapy.  I'll leave it at that.  You, I am sure understand my meaning.
Samantha - Bilingual Health Educator
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Hi Steven S, 

Thanks for posting your questions about the forms and their purpose. The anxious thought forms and panic attack forms are to help you first identify when and where you have anxious thoughts. This is one of the preliminary steps of the cognitive behavioural therapy based program offered here. Once this information is identified it can help you move forward into the next steps such as exposure work and challenging negative thoughts. Have you continued working through the program? It might begin to make more sense as you move along through the various sessions of the program. If not feel free to continue posting questions. 


Samantha, Health Educator
Matt - Health Educator
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Hi Steven S,

I provided you an answer today on how to use the form a bit, and perhaps the samples will help get you started.The "ah ha" moment I don't think has happened for you yet because that may come as you follow through with the program. Moving past session 1, more forms will open that use the first forms (panic/anxious thoughts) and you then begin to challenge the thoughts and make alternative and challenge statements. As you continue and complete session 2 or perhaps even session 3, more forms will open, samples will be provided and you may get that "ah ha" you are looking for. For now, use the forms to help evaluate the factors surrounding a panic/anxious moment, and then later, you will be asked to challenge some of the issues/triggers surrounding the anxious moments.
 
Keep working along the steps, and in time, they should resonate a bit more. 
 
All the best

StevenS
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6 years ago 0 StevenS 29 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
TO THE HEALTH EDUCATORS ONLY!!!
 
I understand in theory the use of the forms mentioned in the subject, but I haven't gotten the "ah-ha" moment with them yet and without that, I can not use them because I don't understand them in the way that I need to understand them.
 
One of the members has tried to help me to understand, but I have not gotten that "ah-ha" yet.
 
Can you help me?  Will you help me until I understand?
 
Steven
StevenS
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6 years ago 0 StevenS 29 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
TO THE HEALTH EDUCATORS ONLY!!!
 
I understand in theory the use of the forms mentioned in the subject, but I haven't gotten the "ah-ha" moment with them yet and without that, I can not use them because I don't understand them in the way that I need to understand them.
 
One of the members has tried to help me to understand, but I have not gotten that "ah-ha" yet.
 
Can you help me?  Will you help me until I understand?
 
Steven
 
kaitie995
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6 years ago 0 kaitie995 177 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
With mine I thought about a situation I've been avoiding, like going to the dentist, and why I'm avoiding it. For example, I'm worried that if I feel anxious while at the dentist I won't be able to escape. The physical symptoms and behaviours I used my imagination for, and past experiences. I know I get fidgety, numbness in my face and hands, tense my muscles etc. 

So with your example, the event might be thinking about Josh, and then you can write down the thoughts associated with that. I'm not sure what it might be for you, but maybe something like "he doesn't like me". Just an example, I don't know the exact situation. But remember that thinking of Josh isn't the issue here, I'm sure others do without any anxiety. It's the thoughts you associate with thinking of him that make you feel anxious, so overcoming them will be what helps you deal with the anxiety, so that is definitely worthwhile.

Kaitie
Davit
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6 years ago 0 Davit 6252 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Moderators only put in a few hours a day here, it could be a while but they will answer you.

During an attack it is hard to concentrate so if you don't write it down you may miss something. Same with the anxious thoughts. If you don't write it you may miss something or you may intentionally block something. Exposure to panic or anxious thoughts will over time make your numbers go up or down. I think the idea is that if you understand your triggers the numbers should go down.  But I too don't understand. You see there are different forms of CBT and I did mine before coming to this site.

Maybe someone else doing it can explain. 
StevenS
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6 years ago 0 StevenS 29 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Please help me to understand the forms mentioned in the subject. I understand what they say and theoretically understand what they mean, but i don't get AT ALL how they are used as they pertain to me.  See below...:
 
 "Now as far as these forms go, one would think that they are straight forward and basically self-explanatory.   For what ever reason, I am either "over-thinking" them (something I do to just about everything), or I am missing something.

 If I use the example I used of thinking of someone and having the surges of anxiety.  I would look at the form and say, "ok, that was about a 60 on the scale".   For the negative thought 1 in my fear level level, a 60;  the situation, "sitting in my chair at the computer"; today's date and now;  physical symptoms, adrenaline surges in solar plexus and heat across chest; anxious thoughts description, "thinking of Josh";  behaviors, ????.  I won't do thought 2 because it would be a repeat of thought 1 in this case.

Now if that is what I am supposed to do, then I don't get the point of doing it at all.  I know what the symptoms are and every little detail is that happens when I think of Josh...and sometimes other things...but right now, it is mostly him that causes these anxiety "surges"...at least when we are talking about "Anxious Thoughts".

 Can someone help me to understand, one, if I have the idea of what the form is for and if I would be using it correctly and two, how is this supposed to do anything but use up TONS of paper because it happens everything I think of Josh or anything pertaining to him, where he lives, something that he does, etc."
 
I need your help with this.
 
Thank you,
 
Steven

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